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David Tobin

What Type of Yoga Is Best for Back Pain

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David Tobin, (2022, March 1). What Type of Yoga Is Best for Back Pain. Psychreg on General. https://www.psychreg.org/what-type-yoga-best-back-pain/
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Most of the people in today’s life are suffering from a back pain problem. The first thing that a doctor advises for back pain is Yoga. It’s not just a mix of some exercises but is mind-body therapy. Yoga helps relieve stress that accompanies back pain. The right poses done properly can help in back pain as well as strengthen your body.

With the help of yoga, you become more aware of your body. This awareness will be very helpful to bring yourself into balance and alignment. And if you visit the doctor’s place, it might be possible that he will recommend tramadol 100mg Pink medicine to relieve you from pain. Discuss how some of these yoga poses may be very useful for the treatment of back pain.

Here are some Yoga poses that can help with back pain:

Cat-cow

It’s a soft, gentle, accessible back-bend stretches and organizes the spine. Practicing this yoga pose also stretches your neck, shoulders, and torso.

Muscles that work in this pose

  • Rectus abdominis
  • Erector spinae
  • Gluteus maximus
  • Triceps
  • Serratus anterior

How to do it

  • First, get on all fours.
  • Place your knees underneath your hips and your wrists underneath your shoulders.
  • Make sure to balance your weight uniformly between all four points.
  • Let your stomach come down towards the floor and Inhale as you look up.
  • Arch your spine facing the ceiling and draw your navel toward your spine finally exhales as you tuck your chin into your chest.
  • Focus on releasing the tension of your body.
  • Keeps the movement going for at least a minute.

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Downward-facing dog

This conventional forward bend pose can be rejuvenating and restful. The practice of this pose helps in sciatica and relieves back pain. It improves strength and helps to correct imbalances in the body.

Muscles that work in this pose:

  • Gluteus maximus
  • Triceps
  • Hamstrings
  • Deltoids
  • Quadriceps

How to do it

  • First, get on all fours.
  • Place your knees underneath your hips and your hands aligned under your wrists.
  • Keep your toes under, squeeze into your hands, and push your knees.
  • Try to pull your sitting bones up facing toward the ceiling.
  • Slightly bend your knees and try to lengthen your tailbone and spine.
  • Keep your heels a little off the floor.
  • Press hardly into your hands.
  • Distribute your overall body weight equally between both sides of the body, keeping in mind the position of your shoulders and hips.
  • With your chin tucked in a little. Remain your head in line with your upper hands.
  • Hold the pose for about a minute.

Extended triangle

This definitive standing position may help reduce neck pain, sciatica, and backache. This yoga pose stretches your hips, spine, and groin, and gives strength to your chest, shoulders, and legs. It is also helpful in relieving anxiety and stress.

Muscles that work in this pose

  • Gluteus medius and maximus
  • Hamstrings
  • Latissimus dorsi
  • Internal oblique
  • Quadriceps

How to do it

  • In a standing position, stretch your feet about 4 feet apart.
  • Turn your left toes out at an angle and right toes to face ahead.
  • Position your hands parallel to the floor and your palms facing down.
  • Lean forward and turn at your right hip to step forward with your torso and arm.
  • Bring your arm to your leg, onto the floor, or a yoga block.
  • Stretch your left arm upward toward the ceiling.
  • Look up, down or forward.
  • Hold the pose for a minimum of 1 minute.
  • Repeat the procedure on the further side also.

Sphinx pose

This tender backbend strengthens your buttocks and spine. It stretches your shoulders, chest, and abdomen. It is also very helpful for stress relief.

Muscles that work in this pose

  • Pectoralis major
  • Trapezius
  • Erector spinae
  • Gluteal muscles
  • Latissimus dorsi

How to do it

  • Position yourself on your stomach and your legs stretched behind you.
  • Grab the muscles of your buttocks, thighs, and lower back.
  • Position your forearms on the floor and elbows underneath your shoulders with your palms facing down.
  • Slowly lift your head and upper torso.
  • Easily engage and lift your lower abdominals for your back support.
  • Instead of crumbling into your lower back make sure that you’re pushing up with your spine and out between the crown of your head.
  • Keep your look straight ahead and try to fully relax in this pose. At the same time, you remain engaged and active.
  • Try to keep the pose for at least 5 minutes.

Cobra pose

This gentle backbend pose stretches your shoulders, chest and abdomen. Practicing this yoga pose gives strength to your spine and also soothes sciatica. It is also helpful in relieving fatigue and stress that can follow back pain.

Muscles that work in this pose

  • Deltoids
  • Triceps
  • Hamstrings
  • Gluteus maximus
  • Serratus anterior

How to do it

  • First lie on your stomach, keep your arms under your shoulders and fingers facing ahead.
  • Pull out your arms firmly to your chest. Don’t let your elbows go to the side.
  • Lean into your hands and slowly lift your shoulders, head, and chest.
  • You can try to lift halfway, partway, or even up.
  • Keep your elbows slightly bent.
  • You can try to drop back your head to deepen the pose.
  • When you exhale release back down to the floor.
  • Keep your hands back by your side and rest your head.
  • To reduce tension from the lower back you can slowly move your hips side to side.

Locust pose

This tender backbend is very helpful in relieving fatigue and lower back pain. It strengthens the arms, legs and back torso.

Muscles that work in this pose

  • Gluteus maximus
  • Triceps
  • Trapezius
  • Erector spinae

How to do it

  • Lay down on your stomach, keep your arms beside your torso and palms facing up.
  • Practice touching your big toes together and keep your heels beside.
  • Keep your forehead gently on the floor.
  • Slowly raise your chest, head, and hands halfway, partway, or up.
  • You may keep your arms together and interlock your fingers behind your back.
  • To intensify the pose, raise your legs.
  • Look ahead or a little upward as you stretch the back of your neck.
  • Keep the position for at least 1 minute.
  • Take a break before repeating the pose.

Bridge pose

This is an inversion and backbend that can be restorative or stimulating. It straightens the spine and will reduce headaches and backaches.

Muscles that work in this pose

  • Gluteus muscles
  • Erector spinae
  • Transverse and rectus abdominis
  • Hamstrings

How to do it

  • Lay down on your back, keep your knees bent and heels touching your sitting bones.
  • Keep your hands near your body.
  • Press your hands and feet into the floor as you push your tailbone up.
  • Keep pushing so that your thighs get parallel to the floor.
  • Keep your hands as it is, keeping your palms together with interlocked fingers underneath your hips, or you can place your arms beneath your hips for support.
  • Keep the pose for at least 1 minute.
  • Free your body by slowly moving your spine back down to the ground, vertebra by vertebra.
  • Keep your knees together.
  • Rest and take deep breaths in this position.

David Tobin did his degree in psychology at the University of Hertfordshire. He is interested in mental health, wellness, and lifestyle.


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