Home Health & Wellness Understanding Lewy Body Dementia ICD-10: Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

Understanding Lewy Body Dementia ICD-10: Symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

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Lewy body dementia (LBD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that affects millions of people worldwide. It is characterised by the accumulation of abnormal protein deposits in the brain called Lewy bodies, which cause damage to the brain cells responsible for cognitive and motor functions. Lewy body dementia is a complex disorder that can present a wide range of symptoms, making it difficult to diagnose and treat.

ICD-10 stands for the International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision. It is a medical classification system used by healthcare professionals to accurately code and classify diseases, disorders, and health conditions. Lewy body dementia ICD-10 is a specific code used to identify and classify LBD in medical records and billing documents.

Symptoms of Lewy body dementia can vary greatly depending on the stage and subtype of the disease. The three subtypes of LBD are:

  • Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). This subtype of LBD is characterised by cognitive impairment, visual hallucinations, and parkinsonism (tremors, rigidity, and difficulty with movement). Other symptoms may include fluctuations in attention and alertness, sleep disturbances, and depression.
  • Parkinson’s disease dementia (PDD). This subtype of LBD is characterised by cognitive impairment that develops in individuals who have already been diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. Symptoms may include visual hallucinations, sleep disturbances, depression, and difficulty with movement.
  • Pure autonomic failure (PAF). This subtype of LBD is characterised by autonomic dysfunction, which affects the body’s ability to regulate basic functions such as blood pressure, heart rate, and digestion. Symptoms may include orthostatic hypotension (a drop in blood pressure when standing up), urinary incontinence, and constipation.

Diagnosis of Lewy body dementia can be challenging, as the symptoms can overlap with other neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. However, healthcare professionals use a combination of methods to diagnose LBD, including:

  • Physical examination. A physical examination can help identify motor symptoms such as tremors, rigidity, and difficulty with movement.
  • Cognitive and neurological testing. Cognitive and neurological tests can evaluate memory, language, attention, and executive functions, as well as assess reflexes, sensation, and coordination.
  • Brain imaging. Brain imaging such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) scans can help detect the presence of Lewy bodies in the brain.
  • Sleep evaluation. Sleep disorders such as rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behaviour disorder are common in LBD and can be assessed through polysomnography (a sleep study).

Treatment of Lewy body dementia ICD-10 is focused on managing symptoms and improving quality of life. There is currently no cure for LBD, but medication and non-pharmacological interventions can help alleviate symptoms. Medications commonly used to treat LBD include:

  • Cholinesterase inhibitors. These drugs are used to improve cognitive symptoms in LBD and are also used to treat Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Parkinson’s medications. Parkinson’s medications such as levodopa can help manage motor symptoms such as tremors and rigidity.
  • Antipsychotics. Antipsychotics may be used to manage visual hallucinations and delusions in LBD, but they should be used with caution due to the risk of worsening motor symptoms and potentially causing adverse reactions such as neuroleptic malignant syndrome.

Non-pharmacological interventions can also be effective in managing symptoms of LBD. These interventions may include physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, and cognitive behavioural therapy. Additionally, lifestyle modifications such as regular exercise, a healthy diet, and good sleep hygiene may help improve overall functioning and quality of life in individuals with LBD.

Lewy body dementia ICD-10 is a specific code used to identify and classify LBD in medical records and billing documents. LBD is a complex disorder that can present a wide range of symptoms, making it challenging to diagnose and treat. Healthcare professionals use a combination of methods to diagnose LBD, including physical examination, cognitive and neurological testing, brain imaging, and sleep evaluation.

Treatment of LBD is focused on managing symptoms and improving quality of life through medication and non-pharmacological interventions. It is important for individuals with LBD and their families to work closely with healthcare professionals to develop a personalized treatment plan that meets their unique needs and goals.


Tim Williamson, a psychology graduate from the University of Hertfordshire, has a keen interest in the fields of mental health, wellness, and lifestyle.

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