3 MIN READ | General

James Wallace

The Psychology Behind Buying Jewellery

Cite This
James Wallace, (2020, August 21). The Psychology Behind Buying Jewellery. Psychreg on General. https://www.psychreg.org/psychology-jewellery/
Reading Time: 3 minutes

Whether it’s a fancy diamond ring or a simple vintage pair of earrings, jewellery makes a statement on our bodies. There are many reasons people are drawn to purchasing jewellery. Whether people are choosing modest pieces or more extravagant and ornate pieces, there’s a psychology that affects their purchasing decisions. 

Below, we’ll investigate what those influences are and how they can affect sales at a jewellery counter. 

To give a simple gift

Because a ring or necklace are ornate decorations, these pieces are often given to loved ones as a simple gift. In relationships, jewellery is given as a gift that expects nothing in return. Many partners in relationships receive diamonds in surprise moments and gesture of unconditional appreciation and affection. 

To seek forgiveness 

When people feel guilty for wronging someone close to them, jewellery is a common way to say ‘I’m sorry’ because diamonds and stones last forever, it has a lasting impact when someone has done something wrong. 

The price point shows that the apology is serious, too. The lasting shine of a diamond reflects that someone’s guilt and commitment to change is greater than just a cheap, fleeting gift to seek redemption.

To indicate worth and commitment

Perhaps the most common psychology behind jewellery, especially diamonds, is the desire to commit romantically with a partner. Wedding rings are symbolic of a lifelong relationship. 

According to https://www.diamondsonrichmond.co.nz, many people walk into a jewellery store having saved three months of salary to buy an engagement ring. This shows how necessary this jewellery piece is to anyone in love, even those who can’t afford the purchase.

The psychology behind this gesture tells the recipient that they’re worth the time, work, and planning it took to purchase such a luxury diamond.

Making a good impression

In the early days of relationships, many people choose to give simple pieces of jewellery to show that they have good taste and the capability to spend more on gifts. Rather than giving something that comes off as cheap or one-time use, jewellery says that you care about making the person feel adored. 

To reflect inner qualities

Many people want jewellery that reflects parts of their personality. It’s not always diamonds that are purchased at the sales counter. Birthstones are a popular reflection of an intrinsic psychology that people have when shopping for jewellery. 

In some cultures, birthstones are thought to have magical healing powers and the potential to bring good luck. Linked to the zodiac calendar, there is a lot of psychology behind peoples motivations to wear their gemstones. 

To commemorate an accomplishment

Jewellery isn’t always received as a gift. People like to buy their own jewels as well. It is extremely popular for people to indulge in diamonds and gemstones when commemorating a big event or achievement. 

Perhaps you are motivated by the birth of a new child or a big job promotion. People are more likely to spend on a lavish gift when they know it will be a reminder of this time in their life when they overcame or achieved something special. 

Conclusion

The act of buying something as extravagant as jewellery is coupled with deep, inner motivation. Psychology of jewellery buying is a big influence on the retailer as well as the customer. Knowing why you’re motivated to make such a luxury purchase better informs the pieces you choose. 

Whether it’s to remind you of a happy time in life, show someone you care about your level of hard work and commitment, or to treat yourself for fun, jewellery purchases are wrapped up in all sorts of feelings. 


James Wallace has been an advocate for mental health awareness for years. He holds a master’s degree in counselling from the University of Edinburgh.


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