Rona dela Rosa

How to Draw the Line of Your Personal Space and Time

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Rona dela Rosa, (2021, June 19). How to Draw the Line of Your Personal Space and Time. Psychreg on Personality Psychology. https://www.psychreg.org/personal-space-time/
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Some of us have experienced unexpected hostile feelings towards other people. This may be because of unsettled arguments, personality clashes, or even an inexplicable situation that we have undergone. Naturally, having this kind of relationship at the workplace is not helpful and healthy for your mental health and well-being. But how should you create a harmonious working relationship with your colleagues? Making a point to establish your principles takes a lot of courage and determination. It is also a step back on distinguishing between personal boundaries and professional responsibilities. 

A lot of people may be silently suffering from specific responsibilities at home and, at work, there are undoubtedly several things we do that lead us to feel that we are not doing the best for ourselves. However, the different persona that we play sometimes hinders our inner personality from establishing a boundary and setting a limit in our personal life. 

As we go about our lives, we try to figure out how to manage our professional and personal lives. Dealing with our tasks at the workplace allows us to establish relationships with our colleagues; we also consider our friends at work as our confidantes. At home, we have another special connection to our family and relatives. The setup that we make differentiates how we communicate and draw connections whenever we are at work or at home. We have to clarify how we draw the line between our personal space and time. Here are a few tips: 

  • Establish a clear connection – Your connection also dictates your space. Establish a good relationship with the people you are always with. They know when you need more personal space. 
  • Learn to say no – Tasks assigned at work may be overwhelming. Sometimes, saying no is the answer if you cannot handle and accomplish the tasks. 
  • Know that you are worth it – Whatever your status at work or at home, you are doing great; you are worthy of what you are doing. 
  • You matter – How you react to a situation, or whether you want to share your suggestions and opinions, others may agree, but more would disagree. Believe that you matter. Your absence will surely be felt. 
  • Believe others – Show that you believe in others as you want them to believe in you too.

What are the things we can do to enjoy more of our personal space and time? You may want to try any of the following:

  • Read your favourite book – Reading develops our mind and increases our creativity. Grab a new book that will help you learn a new hobby or discover the world.
  • Watch movies – Your free time allows you to watch and rewatch your favourite movies or those movies you haven’t yet watched because of your busy schedule.
  • Try a new hobby – During your free time, you may try a new hobby or continue developing what you have already started.
  • Do a makeover – Free time allows you to recreate your room, choose a new paint colour, or rearrange the fixtures in your room. Also, the opportunity to declutter
  • Pamper yourself – You can visit the salon or check new items to add to your closet, and a sound body massage is also a good idea. 

We all need our personal space – sometimes, we are preoccupied with what we are doing at work and responsibilities at home. But making time to enjoy our personal space matters for our mental health and well-being, as it allows us to rethink, re-establish our goals, and find the solitude that we are looking for. This is a great way to get refreshed and restart on the things you thought you did not do well. Find time to enjoy your personal space and respect others’ personal space too.


Rona dela Rosa is the content manager of Psychreg. She is an associate professor at the Polytechnic College of the City of Meycauyan.

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