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New Study Explores Selenium as a Predictor of Metabolic Syndrome in Middle-Aged Women

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Optimising selenium intake in the population to prevent diseases associated with selenium deficiency or excess has become an important issue in modern health care worldwide.

A recent study published in Aging examines the relationship between selenium levels, metabolic syndrome (MetS), and the PPAR-γ gene in women. The research was conducted by a team of scientists from Pomeranian Medical University in Szczecin, West Pomeranian University of Technology, and the Medical University of Warsaw.

MetS is a global health concern, and selenium is known to play a significant role in maintaining metabolic homeostasis. The researchers aimed to determine if there was a relationship between selenium concentrations, MetS, and the role of the PPAR-γ gene, which is an essential mediator in energy balance and cell differentiation.

“The aim of this study was to search for a relationship between selenium concentrations and MetS, and to assess the impact of PPAR-γ on the incidence of MetS with regard to the moderating role of selenium.”

The study involved 390 middle-aged women and comprised a survey-based portion, anthropometric measurements, and blood analysis for glycemia, triglyceride, HDL, and selenium levels. The researchers also conducted a genetic analysis of PPAR-γ polymorphisms. The results indicated that selenium may moderate the effect of the G allele of the PPAR-γ gene on waist circumference and the C and G alleles on elevated blood pressure. Additionally, women with higher selenium levels had non-significantly reduced HDL levels.

Based on their findings, the research team drew four primary conclusions:

  1. No evidence was found linking selenium to MetS or its components.
  2. The effect of individual alleles of the PPAR-γ gene on MetS and its components was not demonstrated.
  3. Selenium concentrations may influence waist circumference in carriers of the G allele and arterial hypertension in carriers of the C and G alleles by affecting PPAR-γ expression.
  4. Higher selenium concentrations increased the odds of higher HDL levels in subjects meeting MetS criteria.

“Recently, optimising selenium intake in the population to prevent diseases associated with a selenium deficiency or excess has been an important issue in modern health care worldwide. Our study suggests the influence of selenium levels on some components of MetS, such as waist circumference, blood pressure and HDL concentration. Thus, serum selenium concentration could be considered as one of the factors affecting some components of MetS.”

Further research in this area could provide additional insights and contribute to the development of more effective strategies for managing and preventing metabolic syndrome in the population.

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