Home Mind & Brain The Neuroscience Behind Reunions: Understanding the Science Behind the Joy of Reconnecting

The Neuroscience Behind Reunions: Understanding the Science Behind the Joy of Reconnecting

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Reunions can evoke powerful emotions, whether it’s a high school reunion, a family reunion, or a reunion with an old friend. The feeling of joy and happiness that comes with reconnecting with someone after a long time is familiar to many people, but the underlying science behind these emotions is not as widely known.

The human brain is wired to seek social connections and form strong bonds with others. Studies have shown that social connection and social support are critical for physical and emotional well-being, and social isolation can have negative impacts on our health. When we form strong relationships with others, our brains release neurotransmitters like dopamine and oxytocin, which help us feel happy and secure.

Reunions can trigger the release of these neurotransmitters and lead to feelings of joy and happiness. Seeing a familiar face after a long time can activate the reward centre of the brain, which releases dopamine, a neurotransmitter associated with pleasure and reward. The anticipation of the reunion and the excitement leading up to it can also release dopamine, creating a sense of anticipation and excitement.

Another important neurotransmitter involved in social bonding is oxytocin. Oxytocin is often called the “love hormone” because it is released during social bonding, particularly during close physical contact like hugging or holding hands. Oxytocin has been shown to increase feelings of trust and empathy, and it plays a role in forming and maintaining social relationships.

Reunions can trigger the release of oxytocin, particularly if there is physical contact involved, like hugging or shaking hands. A study published in the journal Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience found that hugging can increase the release of oxytocin, which in turn can increase feelings of social bonding and closeness. This may be one reason why physical contact during reunions can feel so important.

In addition to the release of neurotransmitters, there may be other factors at play in the joy of reconnecting. For example, nostalgia can play a role in the emotions evoked by reunions. Nostalgia is a feeling of longing or sentimentality for the past, and it has been shown to have positive effects on well-being. Studies have found that nostalgia can increase feelings of social connectedness and can lead to greater life satisfaction.

Reunions often involve reminiscing about the past and reliving old memories, which can trigger feelings of nostalgia. This may be one reason why reunions can be so emotionally powerful. They allow us to revisit and relive happy memories, which can create positive emotions and feelings of joy.

The neuroscience behind reunions can also shed light on why some people may not enjoy reunions or may feel anxious about them. For example, people who have experienced trauma or difficult life events may not associate a social connection with positive emotions. Their brains may not release as much dopamine or oxytocin during social interactions, which can make reunions feel less rewarding.

Additionally, people who struggle with social anxiety may feel overwhelmed by the social interaction involved in reunions. For these individuals, the anticipation of the reunion may trigger the release of stress hormones like cortisol, which can make them feel anxious and uncomfortable.

Understanding the neuroscience behind reunions can help us appreciate the positive effects of social connection and can also help us be more empathetic to those who struggle with social interactions. It is important to remember that not everyone may enjoy reunions or social interactions, and that is okay. We all have different experiences and different ways of processing social interactions.

The neuroscience behind reunions can help us understand the science behind the joy of reconnecting. Reunions can trigger the release of neurotransmitters like dopamine and oxytocin, which can create feelings of pleasure and social bonding. The anticipation of the reunion and the nostalgia associated with reminiscing about the past can also contribute to the positive emotions evoked by reunions.

By understanding the neuroscience behind reunions, we can appreciate the importance of social connection and the positive effects it can have on our well-being. We can also be more understanding and empathetic to those who may not enjoy social interactions or reunions, and we can work to create more inclusive and comfortable social environments for everyone.

For those who enjoy reunions and social connections, it is important to continue to nurture those relationships and maintain those bonds. Regular social interaction and communication can help maintain the release of dopamine and oxytocin and can help foster a sense of social connectedness and well-being.

It is worth noting that not all reunions need to be in person. With the advent of technology and social media, it is easier than ever to reconnect with old friends and family members. Video chats and social media platforms can help facilitate social connections and can allow us to maintain and strengthen relationships with people from all over the world.

The neuroscience behind reunions can help us understand the science behind the joy of reconnecting. Reunions can trigger the release of neurotransmitters like dopamine and oxytocin, as well as the nostalgia associated with reminiscing about the past. By understanding these underlying mechanisms, we can appreciate the importance of social connection and work to create more inclusive and comfortable social environments for everyone.


Ellen Diamond, a psychology graduate from the University of Hertfordshire, has a keen interest in the fields of mental health, wellness, and lifestyle.

© Copyright 2014–2034 Psychreg Ltd