3 MIN READ | Health Psychology

Ways to Boost Your Mental Health During Pregnancy

Dennis Relojo-Howell

Reading Time: 3 minutes

Pregnancy can be quite stressful at times. With so many things to do to prepare for the arrival of the baby, it is so easy to be overwhelmed. The hard part is preparing for the due date when you know you have very little control over it.

Many women experience emotional changes during their pregnancies. This mostly happens when they realise the magnitude of bringing a baby into the world. That’s why it’s always good to have people around who have gone through the same experience to help you cope.

Many women experience emotional changes during their pregnancies.

If you are going to have a healthy and stress-free pregnancy, you must find ways to boost your mental health throughout the nine months. Being mentally strong helps you cope, not only with the stress, but also some of the cravings that can be detrimental to your health and that of the baby.

Here are five tips to help you boost your health during pregnancy:

1. Be realistic

Sometimes, we try so hard to control everything that we end up putting unnecessary pressure on ourselves. Even for someone who has had a baby before, it’s always good to be realistic about the demands you place on yourself. Don’t try to do everything because this will only leave you too exhausted. Whenever you feel tired, make sure you rest enough.

2. Avoid making major changes

It’s always good to keep things as simple as possible during pregnancy. Sometimes, major changes such as switching jobs or moving house can be destabilising, especially for a pregnant woman. Such moves call for a period of adaptation, which is not ideal when a baby is on the way. These are the things you should try to avoid unless they are absolutely necessary.

3. Be physically active

Physical exercise causes the body to release endorphins and lifts your overall mood. It is perfect for both you and the baby. Pregnancy yoga and swimming are just some of the exercises you should try. Of course, if you prefer other exercises, you should choose them. If you can exercise with other pregnant women, that would be great.

4. Positive expectations

Visualise everything working out alright to avoid stressing yourself too much. One question that is quite common is: How big is your baby at 25 weeks pregnant? The best way to approach things as you await the answer to this and many other questions is to have a positive outlook on everything.

Physical exercise causes the body to release endorphins and lifts your overall mood.

5. Understand the entire birth process

Understanding how your body works and what the birth process is all about can help you reduce your anxiety levels. There are so many places you can find any piece of information you are looking for. Take time to read books and watch videos to acquaint yourself with vital information about what you should expect.

How your pregnancy pans out has everything to do with how you approach it and the things and thoughts you occupy yourself with. While it’s not possible to be absolutely worry-free, it is still good to try to avoid things that deepen your worries. If there is anything that is making you more anxious, you should try to avoid it. Also, remember to surround yourself with the right people.


Psychreg is mainly for information purposes only. Materials on this website are not intended to be a substitute for professional advice, diagnosis, medical treatment or therapy. 

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Dennis Relojo-Howell is the world’s first blog psychologist and founder of Psychreg. As an international mental health advocate, he speaks at various conferences around the world. Dennis is also the Editor-in-Chief of Psychreg Journal of Psychology. You can connect with him on Twitter @drelojo_howell 

 

 


 


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