3 MIN READ | Mental Health

How to Prepare for a Mental Health Crisis Living with a Psychologically Challenged Loved One

Dennis Relojo-Howell

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Dennis Relojo-Howell, (2020, March 12). How to Prepare for a Mental Health Crisis Living with a Psychologically Challenged Loved One. Psychreg on Mental Health. https://www.psychreg.org/mental-health-crisis-loved-one/
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A significant population of the world is falling under the likes of mental illnesses. Be it depression or anxiety; every other person on the street has either one. But some of them may have more severe symptoms than the others. Severe symptoms can include episodes where a patient can lose their senses and indulge in acts that could harm them or the people around them. 

With the increased use of the internet and social media, more people are subject to some sort of mental disorder. Tallying traumatic events to them can add fuel to the fire. You never know when a loved one’s condition can become severe, or something triggers them, and they start to be in a crisis.

So it’s better always to be prepared to undertake any crisis and keep your loved one safe. 

Jot down important phone numbers

Even if you’re all the time present with your mentally challenged loved one to help them out and support them in a crisis, there can be severe times when you need extra hands. You can write down on a piece of paper all the contacts of family and friends that can help you out in a crisis.

The list should also include communications of their physicians and psychiatrists. Add in entries of the local crisis helpline to guide you through the crisis and send assistance in case of an accident. 

Seek out means of emergency transport

A crisis with people with a mental health condition must be taken seriously as the person suffering at the moment won’t have control over themselves and can commit dangerous acts. Take the ambulance if there is a hurry. But if you live in a rural area with a hospital miles away, take quick action and call an ambulance airplane. Make sure that you have the numbers jotted down already in your diary of every emergency transport available to you.

Mentally challenged people fall into different categories. Some are more sensitive than others and need more attention. And in case your loved one ends up hurting themselves, you must be ready with the quickest way to transport them to hospitality.

Transmitting them by air can provide you the advantage of ditching the traffic and accidents that could happen in a car due to the acts of the person in crisis. Air critical care can also address an issue sooner and help calm down the patient. 

Remember medications and soothers 

Take good care of the prescriptions that the physician had administered in case of a crisis. Make sure to store them in a separate and easy to approach compartment to have quick access to them. These medications can help calm down your loved one and provide them solace. 

Have your mentally sick loved one always in check and identify the things or activities that trigger the crisis state. If they accidentally encounter one of these things, try to do activities that help calm them down. It could be playing their favourite music or providing them a stress toy. 

Prepare your loved one for crisis

It’s good that you take all the precautions that are necessary in case of a crisis, but you also need to bring your loved one into being aware of it and helping themselves out. After an emergency strikes, it also depends on the patient as to how they handle themselves.

Get your relative or friend into understanding when they need help and advise them into talking out about every issue they face so that they don’t get too stressed. Maintain a good relationship with them and support them.

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Image credit: Freepik


Dennis Relojo-Howell is the founder of Psychreg. He interviews people within psychology, mental health, and well-being on his YouTube channel, The DRH Show


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