3 MIN READ | Mental Health

Tommy Williamson

5 Body Hacks to Manage Stress and Anxiety

Cite This
Tommy Williamson, (2021, May 14). 5 Body Hacks to Manage Stress and Anxiety. Psychreg on Mental Health. https://www.psychreg.org/manage-stress-anxiety/
Reading Time: 3 minutes

It’s a well-known fact that the mind and body are deeply entwined. Mental stress can lead to physical tolls.

With so many people in today’s society struggling with managing their anxiety and stress levels, it’s worth considering how you can tune into your body’s needs to improve your mental stress levels. 

If you find yourself full of stress and anxiety, the good news is that there are a few great solutions out there. Keep reading for the top five body hacks that you can use to beating anxiety and stress. 

See an acupuncturist

While previously used for pain relief, acupuncture has steadily grown in popularity as a remedy for stress and anxiety. 

When you go to an acupuncturist, you have extremely fine needles inserted into your skin at specific points. It might sound stressful to some, but the method has been prevalent for centuries as a way to relieve pain. 

Many people swear that acupuncture worked when other methods did not, so it’s certainly worth a try. Best of all, the process isn’t painful. Instead, it stimulates feel-good hormones that reduce your stress hormones. 

After your appointment, you can even search for gift ideas for acupuncturist practitioners to show how much you appreciate their service. Doing a good deed also can lead to more feel-good hormones, so it’s a win-win for you and your acupuncturist. 

Massage 

While getting a massage, your body produces increased levels of dopamine, serotonin, and endorphins. All of these have strong anti-stress properties. 

Massages can also decrease a common stress hormone called cortisol. It’s also beneficial that visiting spas tend to have a calming, relaxed setting that also contributes to your overall feeling of well-being. 

Exercise 

Exercise effectively manages stress and anxiety so well that doctors often prescribe it as a tool for those suffering from depression or anxiety disorders. 

Not only will you feel physically healthier after exercising, but your body also releases the same feel-good hormones you get from acupuncture. 

Regular exercise also contributes to a better night’s sleep, which has a direct impact on stress. 

Deep breathing 

It might seem like a gimmick, but conducting deep breathing exercises can also drastically improve your levels of anxiety and stress. 

When you do a breathing exercise, the goal is to make your body feel relaxed. Breathing deeply sends a signal to your brain to relax and calm down, allowing you to become less tense. 

Deep breathing also increases the amount of oxygen going to your brain, which stimulates your nervous system. The result is an overall feeling of calm. 

Take a break 

Last but not least, reducing your stress and anxiety levels can be as easy as taking a break. 

Sometimes, we need rest from the things that we do every day, especially things that can be overwhelming, like school or work. It’s important to remember that you don’t always have to be going somewhere or doing something and that sometimes all you need to do is read a good book or watch a movie. 

Simply removing yourself from the stressful situation while doing work and physically stepping away can help redirect your energy. It can have profound effects on mental health. 

Final thoughts 

Struggling with anxiety and stress can sometimes feel like a hopeless process, but in reality, there are many things you can do to relax. Much of stress related to the mind is something you can correct by being attuned to your body. Whether you see an acupuncturist or practice deep breathing, these body hacks can help you feel better in no time at all. 


Tommy Williamson did his degree in psychology at the University of Edinburgh. He has an ongoing interest in mental health and well-being.


Disclaimer: Psychreg is mainly for information purposes only. Materials on this website are not intended to be a substitute for professional advice, diagnosis, medical treatment, or therapy. Never disregard professional psychological or medical advice nor delay in seeking professional advice or treatment because of something you have read on this website. Read our full disclaimer here

Copy link