2 MIN READ | Community Psychology

Jason Kulpa, Founder of The Kulpa Foundation Suggests Ideas on How to Attract and Retain Volunteers

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Psychreg, (2020, March 27). Jason Kulpa, Founder of The Kulpa Foundation Suggests Ideas on How to Attract and Retain Volunteers. Psychreg on Community Psychology. https://www.psychreg.org/how-to-attract-volunteers/
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The success of a charitable event or community gathering can often rely on assistance from volunteers. Volunteers are the most treasured resources for nonprofit organisations. Unfortunately, for many groups, finding dedicated volunteers can be difficult and can result in stress and frustration, or worst of all, a failed event. 

Jason Kulpa, the driving force behind The Kulpa Foundation as well as the founder and former CEO of UE.co, depends on passionate volunteers during events for The Kulpa Foundation. The Kulpa Foundation has embraced the vision of a world where all people have the resources and support they need to live a vibrant and fulfilling life.

Jason shares ideas to encourage both first time and repeat volunteerism:

Provide an amazing personal experience

Successful volunteer experiences, in turn, lead to willing volunteers. So, before you blame your lack of volunteers on an uncharitable community, take a look at your organisation, first. 

Be strategic in the way you host your volunteers to provide each with a great personalised experience. Focus on making a positive first impression through a warm welcome.

Communicate clearly about the organisation and relay easily digestible volunteer expectations. Consider delegating host duties to several non-profit workers or volunteers; doing so will ensure that each new volunteer is comfortably guided through the facility and has easy access to a reliable resource for any additional questions.  

Positivity is essential when working with volunteers. An environment that supports positive representation effortlessly surges excitement and passion. Experiences infused with such energy will make volunteers return again and again.

Reach out to groups looking for service opportunities

There is always an individual looking for a service opportunity, and knowing where to look is vital. Schools and colleges are a high point of contact when you need volunteers. Students who are looking to improve their resume or have joined a service club that requires a certain number of volunteer hours will happily sign up.

Connecting with local service groups such as Girl Scouts or Boy Scouts can also widen your volunteer ratio.

Delegate strengths

A volunteer that leaves with a good experience and the feeling of job satisfaction will most likely be back for round two. Delegate jobs that match with people’s strengths to help boost self-worth as well as instil work proactivity. You can do so by creating and publicising a job description of your ideal candidate for the volunteer position.

If time is of the essence before your event, consider having volunteers fill out a quick questionnaire upon arrival to determine what their strengths are and what volunteer job best matches.

Never cease to grow in the way you approach your volunteer process continually. After every event, review areas of weakness to focus on in the future. Constant improvements will provide a better outcome for both the volunteer and the nonprofit.

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Image credit: Freepik

 


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