2 MIN READ | Health Psychology

High Intensity Interval Training Matters for Increasing Fitness

Psychreg

Cite This
Psychreg, (2019, December 17). High Intensity Interval Training Matters for Increasing Fitness. Psychreg on Health Psychology. https://www.psychreg.org/high-intensity-interval-training/
Reading Time: 2 minutes

 540 total views,  2 views today

High intensity interval training (HIIT) is only effective for improving fitness when performed at 60-second intervals, according to new research from Liverpool John Moores University, presented today 17th December at The Physiological Society early career conference with the theme ‘Future Physiology 2019: Translating Cellular Mechanisms into Lifelong Health Strategies’.

Currently 40% of people in the UK do not meet the Government’s physical activity guidelines, with a lack of time cited as the most common barrier.

HIIT, meaning short burst (anywhere from 20–90 seconds) of intense cardio exercises is a time-efficient alternative that has been making headlines in the last decade. Specifically, home-based HIIT, which involves doing HIIT training at home using simple body weight exercises, has become popular because it gets rid of the barriers such as the time and money required to go to the gym.

Researchers at Liverpool John Moores University compared two popular HIIT protocols (60HIIT and 30HIIT) performed for six weeks, three times per week, in a sample of 26 previously sedentary men and women. 60HIIT means 6–10 60-second intervals with 60 seconds of rest, whereas 30HIIT means 4-8 30 seconds intervals with 120 seconds of rest.

They kept track of training adherence and intensity remotely via a heart rate monitor that fed info through a mobile app. The researchers looked at three parameters of fitness: aerobic capacity, stiffness of arteries, and body composition (meaning how much muscle and fat they had) during the six weeks of HIIT.

Aerobic capacity increased after six weeks of 60HIIT but there was no difference for 30HIIT on any of the three parameters. This means that 60HIIT should be used over 30HIIT because the former improves fitness whereas the latter doesn’t.

Hannah Church, one of the researchers involved said: ‘In order for people to get the most out of HIIT, which may be the answer to the difficulties of paying for and getting to the gym, we need to get the timing right. Our research showed just how important this is, because we found that 30 second intervals with 120 seconds of rest meant that participants’ heart rates didn’t stay up; 120 seconds is just too long to be resting for.’

***

Image credit: Freepik


Disclaimer

Psychreg is mainly for information purposes only. Materials on this website are not intended to be a substitute for professional advice, diagnosis, medical treatment, or therapy. Never disregard professional psychological or medical advice nor delay in seeking professional advice or treatment because of something you have read on this website.

We work with different advertisers and sponsors to bring you free and quality content. We cannot be held liable for the actions of any of these vendors. Any links provided on this website to other websites are not intended to provide an endorsement, approval, recommendation or preference by Psychreg. We have no liability or responsibility whatsoever for the privacy practices or the content of those linked websites whatsoever.

We publish differing views and we foster freedom of expression. Opinion pieces on this website do not reflect the views of the editor or any of our contributors.

We aim to create a platform where people can better understand each other.  If you have an alternative view on any of the articles that we published, please email: drelojo.howell@gmail.com

Read our full disclaimer here

Copy link