Dennis Relojo-Howell

Employee Burnout Crisis: What’s The Solution?

Cite This
Dennis Relojo-Howell, (2022, July 15). Employee Burnout Crisis: What’s The Solution?. Psychreg on Organisational Psychology. https://www.psychreg.org/employee-burnout-crisis-what-solution/
Reading Time: 4 minutes

In today’s fast paced, constantly connected world, it’s no surprise that employee burnout has become a crisis. With technology at our fingertips 24/7, we’re always accessible and always on the go. This constant demand for our time and energy takes its toll, leaving us burned out and exhausted.

Let’s first talk about the three main causes of why we are getting burned out.

Mental health

The way we think, how we react and our emotions. A lot of times, when we are stressed out, anxious or just plain tired, it can lead to some pretty negative thinking. This type of thinking can then lead to us feeling burned out.

Negative thinking patterns like these are a huge part of why people get burned out at work:

  • All-or-nothing thinking. You see things in black and white, believing that you’re either a complete success or an utter failure. There’s no middle ground.
  • Overgeneralising. You take one small event and assume that it will always happen this way. For example, you make a mistake at work and instead of seeing it as a one-time thing, you believe that you’re always going to screw up.
  • Disqualifying the positive. You brush off any good experiences or accomplishments, telling yourself that they don’t count.
  • Catastrophising. You always expect the worst to happen. For example, you might be worried about a big project coming up at work, and instead of thinking that you’ll do your best, you immediately assume that you’re going to fail miserably.
  • Personalisation. You blame yourself for things that are out of your control. For example, if your team doesn’t do well on a project, you might believe that it’s all your fault.

These negative thinking patterns can lead to a whole host of emotional problems, including anxiety, depression, and anger. And career coaches from Melbourne mention that ‘when we’re dealing with emotional distress, it’s hard to stay motivated or be productive at work.’ We might start calling in sick more often, or our performance might start to suffer. This is how mental health problems can contribute to burnout.

Physical health

This one is pretty self explanatory. When we don’t feel good, we’re not going to be able to do our best work. ‘If we’re constantly tired, run down, or sick, it’s going to be tough to power through our days,’ pointed out a nutritionist from San Francisco.

And unfortunately, the demands of modern life make it easy to let our physical health slide. We might skip meals, or eat unhealthy foods on the go. We might not get enough sleep, or exercise regularly. We might not see our doctor for regular checkups. All of these things can contribute to physical problems that make burnout more likely.

Environment

This includes both our physical environment and the people we work with. If our workplace is stressful, chaotic, or unorganized, it can make burnout more likely. And if we don’t feel supported by our colleagues or bosses, that can also lead to burnout.

So what’s the solution? How can we manage our time and energy better so we don’t reach the point of burnout? One solution is an employee assistance program. EAPs provide employees with resources to help them deal with stress and manage their workload.

What is an employee assistance programme?

An employee assistance programme (EAP) is a workplace service that provides employees with resources to manage stress and other mental health issues. EAPs typically offer counseling, stress management programs, and other services to help employees stay healthy and productive.

EAPs are offered by many employers as a way to promote employee wellness. They can also help reduce absenteeism and turnover and improve job satisfaction.

If you’re feeling overwhelmed at work, consider talking to your employer about enrolling in an EAP. It could be just what you need to get back on track.

How does an EAP work?

EAPs typically provide confidential counseling services to employees who are struggling with stress, anxiety, depression, or other mental health issues. Counsellors can help employees identify the root of their problem and develop a plan to address it.

They also offer stress management programs, workshops, and other resources. These programmes can teach employees how to better manage their time and energy, and cope with stress in healthy ways.

Some EAPs also provide work-life balance resources, such as child care referral services and financial counselling. These services can help employees juggle their work and personal responsibilities without feeling overwhelmed.

What are the benefits of an EAP?

They can offer many benefits to employees who are struggling with stress or other mental health issues. Counseling services can help employees identify the root of their problem and develop a plan to address it.

EAPs can also provide employees with tools to better manage their time and energy, and cope with stress in healthy ways. These resources can help employees stay productive and satisfied with their jobs.

In addition, EAPs can help reduce absenteeism and turnover, and improve workplace morale. If you’re feeling overwhelmed at work, consider talking to your employer about enrolling in an EAP. It could be just what you need to get back on track.

All in all, EAPs can offer many benefits to employees who are struggling with stress or other mental health issues. If you’re feeling overwhelmed at work, consider talking to your employer about enrolling in an EAP. It could be just what you need to get back on track.


Dennis Relojo-Howell is the managing director of Psychreg.

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