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Dostarlimab: A Promising Colorectal Cancer Drug Trial

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Colorectal cancer is one of the most common types of cancer worldwide. According to the American Cancer Society, it is estimated that over 106,970 new cases of colorectal cancer will be diagnosed in the US in 2023 alone, and over 52,550 people will die from the disease. The high incidence and mortality rate of colorectal cancer makes it imperative to develop effective treatments to improve patient outcomes.

In recent years, immunotherapy has emerged as a promising treatment option for various types of cancer, including colorectal cancer. Immunotherapy works by harnessing the body’s immune system to target and destroy cancer cells. Dostarlimab is a promising new immunotherapy drug that is currently being studied in clinical trials for its efficacy in treating colorectal cancer.

Dostarlimab is a human monoclonal antibody that targets the PD-1 receptor on T cells, a type of immune cell that plays a critical role in the body’s immune response to cancer. By blocking the PD-1 receptor, dostarlimab enhances the ability of T cells to recognise and destroy cancer cells.

The drug has already shown promising results in clinical trials for other types of cancer, including advanced endometrial cancer and non-small cell lung cancer. Now, researchers are studying its efficacy in treating patients with advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer.

One such trial is the GARNET study, a phase I/II clinical trial that aims to evaluate the safety and efficacy of dostarlimab in patients with advanced or metastatic solid tumours, including colorectal cancer. The trial included 111 patients with advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer who had previously received at least two lines of standard therapy.

The results of the trial, which were published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, showed the promising efficacy of dostarlimab in treating advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer. Of the 111 patients enrolled in the trial, 20 patients (18%) had a partial response to dostarlimab, meaning that their tumours shrank in size. Additionally, 31 patients (28%) had stable disease, meaning that their tumours did not grow or shrink significantly.

The study also showed that dostarlimab was well-tolerated by patients, with no unexpected safety concerns. The most common side effects reported were fatigue, rash, and diarrhoea.

These promising results have led to the initiation of phase III clinical trial, which aims to evaluate the efficacy of dostarlimab in combination with chemotherapy in patients with advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer who have not previously received treatment. The trial is currently ongoing, and the results are eagerly awaited.

If the results of the phase III trial are positive, dostarlimab could become a new standard of care for patients with advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer. The drug has the potential to improve patient outcomes by extending survival and improving quality of life.

However, it is important to note that dostarlimab is not a cure for colorectal cancer. Like all cancer treatments, it has limitations and potential side effects. Patients should discuss the potential benefits and risks of dostarlimab with their healthcare provider to determine if it is the right treatment option for them.

In addition to the ongoing clinical trials, researchers are also studying the use of dostarlimab in combination with other treatments, such as radiation therapy and other immunotherapy drugs. These studies aim to further improve the efficacy of dostarlimab in treating colorectal cancer and other types of cancer.

Dostarlimab is a promising new immunotherapy drug that has shown efficacy in treating advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer. The results of phase I/II GARNET trial were promising, and the ongoing phase III trial aims to further evaluate the drug’s potential. If the results of the phase III trial are positive, dostarlimab could become a new standard of care for patients with advanced or metastatic colorectal cancer.

It is important to note that dostarlimab is not yet approved for the treatment of colorectal cancer, and it is still considered an investigational drug. However, the promising results from clinical trials suggest that it could become an important new tool in the fight against colorectal cancer.


Tim Williamson, a psychology graduate from the University of Hertfordshire, has a keen interest in the fields of mental health, wellness, and lifestyle.

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