3 MIN READ | Health Psychology

News Release

How Dancing Can Boost Your Health and Well-Being as You Age?

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News Release, (2022, September 22). How Dancing Can Boost Your Health and Well-Being as You Age?. Psychreg on Health Psychology. https://www.psychreg.org/dancing-boost-health-well-being-age/
Reading Time: 3 minutes

Dancing provides many health and well-being benefits, no matter how old you are. The announcement of a firm family favourite, Strictly Come Dancing, returns to our screens this week, sparking an interest in dancing across the country.

New research by Lottie has found in the run-up to, Strictly Come Dancing, more older generations are interested in starting dance classes than ever before, with online searches surging over the last three months.

  • 200% increase in online searches for ‘dance workout for seniors’.
  • 75% increase in online searches for ‘dance exercise for seniors’.
  • 40% increase in online searches for ‘easy line dances for seniors’.
  • 25% increase in online searches for ‘ballroom dancing for seniors near me’

Hannah Karim, care expert manager at Lottie, shares: ‘Strictly Come Dancing is a popular TV show across all generations and provides great entertainment for everyone to enjoy as a family.’

‘It’s no surprise we’ve seen an interest in senior dance classes across the country following the announcement of the show’s return this autumn; dancing provides great health and well-being benefits as you age.’

From improving your strength and balance to supporting heart health and easing muscle and joint pain, the power of dance can support your physical health as you age. Dancing is a great hobby for all ages and allows socialising and connecting with others.

The social benefits of joining a dance group are just as important as the physical health benefits later in life. From dancing in your living room with loved ones to joining a local dance group, there are many ways you can get involved in dancing and join in on this year’s strictly fever.

With the excitement for the launch of this year’s Strictly Come Dancing series in full swing, Cynthia Duvigneau, head of activities at Loveday Chelsea Court Place (London’s only senior living members club and dementia care specialists), shares how Loveday&Co are supporting their members to reap the benefits of dancing.

‘Dancing is one of the most wonderful activities for our members to participate in. It’s a great physical workout, but because we are dancing to music we love, it never feels like exercise! Dancing is good for the heart and soul, uplifting and bringing joy to all.’

‘We love taking music requests from our members to get them dancing – this is great reminiscence, evokes happiness, and has the power to improve mood. Some of our favourite music to dance to is ABBA, The Carpenters (Top of the World always gets people moving and smiling) and anything from the Andrew Sisters.’

Well-being benefits of dancing as you age

Encourages social interaction

Dancing is a social hobby and can help reduce any feelings of loneliness some people may experience as they age. Most types of dance, such as ballroom and line dancing, involve group or partner dancing, encouraging you to form connections and friendships later in life.

One of the best aspects of dancing is bringing people together in a fun and warm environment, most friendships in life are formed on common interests and passions, and local dance groups can help you to make long-lasting friendships outside the studio.

Improves heart health

Dancing is an aerobic and fun way to get your heart rate up and stay active as you age. You can take it at your own pace and take a break when needed, making dancing great interval training that will help improve your overall fitness levels.

Promotes balance and strength

As we age, our muscle mass, bone strength, and overall balance decrease; however, physical activity such as dancing promotes good balance and strength and can prevent the risk of falls, helping you to stay active and well as you age.

Gentle on your body

Dancing requires you to use many different body parts, from your head to your toes, meaning it can be a full-body workout. Gentler dance forms can also be a great way to improve your fitness if you have limited mobility.

One of the best things about dancing is that you can do it from anywhere at any time – you can even dance from the comfort of a chair; all you need is your favourite music nearby.

How you can get involved in dance later in life?

Get your loved one involved

You don’t need to leave your home to experience the benefits of dancing; you can start from the comfort of your own home. Dancing can be a great way to spend quality time with your loved ones; why not turn on some music and ask your partner, friends or family members to join you to celebrate the new series?

Search for local groups

There are lots of social dance groups for seniors set up across the country. Why not see if your local community centre has a dance class running? A quick search online will pull up local dance classes nearby for you to try.

Charities such as Age UK also have a list of activities and groups you can explore in your local area; this could be a great place to start your search.

Start your own group

If you’re struggling to find a dance class for seniors in your area, you could always get a group of friends or family members together and start your own. You and your friends could take turns to choose a theme for the week, including ballroom, jive and many more to try. 


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