4 MIN READ | Wellness

Tommy Wiliamson

How Can Busy Professionals Maintain a Healthy Diet

Cite This
Tommy Wiliamson, (2021, June 1). How Can Busy Professionals Maintain a Healthy Diet. Psychreg on Wellness. https://www.psychreg.org/busy-professionals-healthy-diet/
Reading Time: 4 minutes

In these days and age, a busy lifestyle is a norm, with more and more people having no time to pay attention to what they eat. Poor diet, however, is often an underlying cause for serious health problems, as well as fatigue and anxiety. Fortunately, even busy professionals can easily maintain a healthy diet, and here is how.

Never skip breakfast (make it simple)

Even the busiest workaholics shouldn’t skip breakfast, which is undoubtedly the most important meal of the day. Why? Simply because it literally kickstarts your day and prepares your body for what is coming next – a long day chock-full of tasks to be done. There is no healthy diet without a decent breakfast, therefore make sure to take it seriously and plan ahead what you’re going to eat tomorrow morning.

No prizes for guessing, you are in a rush and do not really have time to cook or prepare all those complicated recipes you’ve seen on kitchen TV, Food Network, or similar channels dedicated to DIY chefs. The great news is a healthy breakfast doesn’t have to be a time-consuming endeavour for high-skilled masters. Greek yogurt from your local supermarket paired with banana will perfectly serve the purpose. However, if you have just five minutes, it’s a good idea to make a smoothie (no sugar, of course). Use banana and veggies or fruits of your choice, and add a bit of coconut water if you like it, if not, the aforementioned Greek yogurt is just fine. 

In case, having breakfast at home is not an option, no worries, you still can enjoy the first meal of the day at the office or wherever you are that early morning. Simply take advantage of a quality portable blender and blend on the go for a perfect start to the day. The opportunities are endless because apart from smoothies, you can also make juices, protein shakes, and even light salad dressings and creamy soups.

Always pre-portion snacks 

There are a plethora of healthy snacks that can help you get through a stressful day and give you the energy boost when you need it the most. However, the great bulk of healthy snacks (nuts, for instance) are packed with calories, therefore it is of utmost importance to pre-portion them in order to avoid overeating. Even fruits in large quantities are not good for your digestive system, not to mention all those scrumptious hazelnuts, cashews that should be consumed only in small portions of up to 30 grams. If you take the whole bag, chances are you will eat it pretty quickly but when you pre-portion your snacks, you simply cannot eat more than you take to work. So, don’t be lazy, divide your favourite snacks into small portions at home.

Drink lots of water

Make sure you have access to clean drinking water at your workplace. The majority of offices have water coolers or similar appliances but if your company doesn’t provide such an option, you can simply bring a couple of bottles with you. Remember, pure water is the best beverage you can offer to your body and brain, so don’t underestimate the importance of staying hydrated throughout the entire day. 

Stick to your eating routine

And if you still don’t have one, it’s the right time to develop it. Set up specific times for your meals, especially those you have at the office. The majority of nutritionists agree that eating at the same time of the day is good not only for your digestive system but also for the entire body and even the brain. Try to stick to your own routine for at least seven days, and you’ll see what we mean.

Don’t mix food with work

There is nothing worse than eating and working at the same time. Even though multitasking may seem a great and time-saving solution, this ‘innovative’ approach can cost your body dearly. It is very dangerous not to pay attention to what you’re eating because your brain doesn’t register the fact you’ve just had lunch or dinner and continues to send a message telling you that you’re still hungry. That’s why always set aside enough time to enjoy your meal and chew food mindfully. 

Avoid heavy lunches

Even though lunch is definitely a great opportunity to take a break from work and enjoy a nice meal and small talk, avoid heavy food that is jam-packed with calories. First, your working day is not over, and it’s very difficult to work productively on a full stomach. Secondly, too much fat and carbs are bad for your health, hence forget about takeaways and switch to a couple of slices of lean meat combined with a vegetable salad. Needless to say, it’s better to prepare and pack your lunch at home.

Walk whenever possible

A sedative lifestyle is one of the biggest problems in these modern days, which is especially true for people who have to sit for hours at their offices. Try to use every opportunity to leave your desk and walk. For instance, when speaking on the phone, you can walk instead of sitting in your chair, of course, if the atmosphere at your office allows for that. 

Have early dinner

One of the biggest mistakes made by many people are to have dinner too late, which has a negative impact on their digestive system and often triggers a range of health complications. Enjoying your dinner at least four hours before bedtime will let you feel great and full of energy in the morning. In addition to that, it helps detoxify the body and prevent weight gain. When you create your eating routine, make sure to plan dinner as early as possible.

No doubt, your career is important to you, but your health is paramount. A healthy diet brings plenty of benefits not only to your body but also to your brain. Use these tips and advice to develop and maintain your healthy eating routine that among other things will boost your productivity at work. 


Tommy Williamson did his degree in psychology at the University of Edinburgh. He is interested in mental health and well-being.


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