Home Society & Culture Belief in Infinite Afterlife Could Influence End-of-Life Decisions in Suicide Bombers, Martyrs, and Self-Immolators

Belief in Infinite Afterlife Could Influence End-of-Life Decisions in Suicide Bombers, Martyrs, and Self-Immolators

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Suicide bombings have been on the rise since the 9/11 attacks, according to a 2016 report by the University of Chicago. The average number of suicide bombings increased from 4.4 in the 1980s to 13 in the 1990s, and from 2001 to 2010, the rate rose to 260, and from 2011 to 2016, it increased to 441. This trend suggests that some individuals are willing to give their lives for a cause.

The idea of “dying for a cause” has been present throughout history, including in religious, spiritual, or strongly held ideological beliefs. Examples range from ancient Greek and Roman philosophers to modern extremist groups such as Al Qaeda, the Klu Klux Klan, and the Aryan Brotherhood. The decision to take one’s life for a cause may seem irrational to outsiders, but it has been a recurring phenomenon throughout history.

A recent study published in the journal Rationality and Society investigates the impact of belief in an infinite afterlife on end-of-life decisions, particularly in extreme cases such as suicide bombing, martyrdom, and self-immolation. The study found that individuals who strongly believe in their ideology can make rational decisions about the end of their lives.

The researchers looked at people who were martyrs, suicide bombers and self-immolators, and tried to understand why they would give up their lives. They found that all three groups believed in an afterlife that would reward them with infinite happiness. The study also found that when people calculate how happy they will be in their lifetime, they usually don’t take the afterlife into account.

To understand the decisions of people who believe in an afterlife, the study created a different way of calculating happiness that includes the afterlife. The study suggests that this new way of thinking could help explain why some people choose to end their lives. However, it’s unclear how this way of thinking applies to everyday decisions that people make.

The study’s findings provide insight into the complex decision-making process for end-of-life decisions, particularly in extreme cases. The authors emphasise the importance of understanding the various factors that motivate individuals to make such decisions and the role of belief in an infinite afterlife in shaping those decisions. The researchers emphasised that belief in an infinite religious afterlife is only one potential factor motivating individuals to choose suicide bombing, martyrdom, or self-immolation.

The findings raise important ethical questions about how societies should address individuals who are willing to die for a cause. One question is whether individuals who make extreme end-of-life decisions should be treated differently from others who make rational decisions about the end of their lives. Another question is how to balance respect for an individual’s beliefs with the need to protect innocent lives.

The study highlights the need for a better understanding of the factors that motivate individuals to make extreme end-of-life decisions. While belief in an infinite afterlife may play a role, there are likely many other factors at play as well. It is important for researchers, policymakers, and society as a whole to address these complex issues in an informed manner.

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