2 MIN READ | Positive Psychology

Jashan Jot Kaur

Too Much Anger Isn’t Good for Our Mental Health. We Need to Learn How to Achieve Emotional Balance

Cite This
Jashan Jot Kaur, (2021, May 7). Too Much Anger Isn’t Good for Our Mental Health. We Need to Learn How to Achieve Emotional Balance. Psychreg on Positive Psychology. https://www.psychreg.org/anger-isnt-good-for-mental-health/
Reading Time: 2 minutes

Anger and anxiety seem to be the two dominant emotions of our days. In this fast-paced and emotionless world, a serious disconnect between what is assumed to be going around us and what is actually happening within us is intensifying the pressures on life with the undesired outcome.

The personal and public anger manifests itself differently in social and political spheres; there is civil unrest, industrial strife, criminal activity, mental health issues, and deaths – these are some feelings that link the individuals to the actions of the people.

Can we do anything? Some may call it as ‘angrynomics‘, which teaches us some compelling reasons to pepper our lives without disdain. We all live in an angry world that is just one part of reality; the crucial other is to take a deep dive to rid ourselves of this expanding anomaly.

Here are few ways to redress these emotions.

Ask engaging questions

No one seek to address the question of why there is so much anger? Why public can’t unite? Why people can’t comprehend the key developments of the time and ward off the chaotic and disparate events?

Scrutinise anger

Angrynomics is an emerging social phenomenon with peaks of powerlessness. Brewing anger in society is as much private as public, varying in intensity and manifestation. Why the world is the way it is today, and what can be done to change it? Perhaps we mistakenly think that democracy is a major rule. Can the anger be scrutinised to bring back the power and unity?

Watch out for signs of anger

Angrynomics provides a good lens to understand the current aura of togetherness in the society or the world. The changes to the system, be it political or humanitarian, anger will continue to bubble up ominously. The future of the society must be addressed by the timely policies to determine the righteousness of the public.

Identify what’s making you angry

The experts in psychology say anger is a valid emotion. It is only bad when its takes control and makes you do things you don’t want to do. Few may argue that anger may be seen as positive energy towards the response. With the pandemic ripping the world apart, it is essential to address the stress factors for the changes at the macro level.

Infuse positivity

Computer rebooting, bank leverages, wage stagnation have already bugged the entire system troubling the world to accept the new policies. To make the economics sustainable some proposals to end this COVID-19 battle needs funds and legitimacy towards the collective purpose. Thus anger can be a positive motivating force.

Acknowledge anger

Anger is a valid emotion. It is only bad when its takes control and makes you do things you don’t want to do. It is a timely call for correction. With the pandemic having ripped the world apart, nothing could be more compelling than addressing the micro stressors on top of emerging macro challenges.


Jashan Jot Kaur is a researcher at Punjab Agricultural University, Ludhiana.


Disclaimer: Psychreg is mainly for information purposes only. Materials on this website are not intended to be a substitute for professional advice, diagnosis, medical treatment, or therapy. Never disregard professional psychological or medical advice nor delay in seeking professional advice or treatment because of something you have read on this website. Read our full disclaimer here

Copy link