Home Health & Wellness Alzheimer’s Mortality Gap: Mississippi Tops the List; New York Boasts the Lowest Rates – Find Out Where Your State Ranks

Alzheimer’s Mortality Gap: Mississippi Tops the List; New York Boasts the Lowest Rates – Find Out Where Your State Ranks

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Alzheimer’s disease, a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is the leading cause of dementia and a major public health challenge in the US. This debilitating condition is marked by memory loss, cognitive decline, and behavioural changes that eventually result in severe functional impairment.

The 2020 Alzheimer’s Disease Mortality by State report from the National Center for Health Statistics sheds light on the mortality rates of Alzheimer’s disease across different states, uncovering striking trends and disparities. Understanding these patterns is crucial for developing targeted interventions and allocating resources to mitigate the impact of Alzheimer’s disease on affected individuals, their families, and healthcare systems.

Alzheimer’s disease mortality rates: an overview

The data provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) displays the number of Alzheimer’s disease-related deaths per 100,000 total population for each state. While these statistics have been adjusted for age distribution and population size, it is important to note that they do not consider other state-specific characteristics that could impact mortality levels. Additionally, the rankings can be unstable when the number of deaths is relatively small. Despite these limitations, we can still draw some meaningful conclusions from the data.

List of US states, ranked by Alzheimer’s disease mortality rates (lowest to highest) 

  1. New York: 14 – 3,862
  2. Maryland: 15.8 – 1,172
  3. Massachusetts: 18.6 – 1,751
  4. Florida: 19.8 – 7,274
  5. Connecticut: 20.3 – 1,084
  6. New Jersey: 22.1 – 2,677
  7. Hawaii: 22.8 – 572
  8. Pennsylvania: 23.2 – 4,544
  9. Montana: 23.8 – 346
  10. New Hampshire: 26.1 – 491
  11. Alaska: 26.8 – 139
  12. New Mexico: 26.6 – 728
  13. Maine: 27.9 – 587
  14. Nevada: 28.7 – 943
  15. Illinois: 28.7 – 4,636
  16. Virginia: 28.7 – 2,861
  17. Kansas: 25.3 – 979
  18. Iowa: 31.9 – 1,467
  19. Rhode Island: 31.9 – 501
  20. Vermont: 31 – 280
  21. Arizona: 32.7 – 3,238
  22. Kentucky: 32.3 – 1,719
  23. Nebraska: 32.2 – 808
  24. Wyoming: 32.1 – 227
  25. Indiana: 34.3 – 2,803
  26. Missouri: 34.9 – 2,873
  27. Wisconsin: 33.2 – 2,595
  28. Minnesota: 35 – 2,587
  29. West Virginia: 35.9 – 932
  30. Delaware: 35.1 – 474
  31. North Carolina: 37.5 – 4,713
  32. Oregon: 37 – 2,008
  33. Michigan: 36.9 – 4,864
  34. Colorado: 36.9 – 2,164
  35. Idaho: 36.7 – 749
  36. Washington: 42.9 – 3,704
  37. Utah: 42.9 – 1,116
  38. California: 40.6 – 18,775
  39. South Carolina: 40.4 – 2,575
  40. North Dakota: 39.7 – 426
  41. South Dakota: 39.7 – 488
  42. Ohio: 38 – 5,955
  43. Oklahoma: 38.2 – 1,817
  44. Texas: 44.6 – 11,918
  45. Tennessee: 44.4 – 3,607
  46. Georgia: 45.9 – 4,782
  47. Louisiana: 45.8 – 2,450
  48. Arkansas: 45.6 – 1,782
  49. Alabama: 50.8 – 3,093
  50. Mississippi: 58 – 2,018

Highest mortality rates

Mississippi has the highest Alzheimer’s disease mortality rate in the United States, with 58 deaths per 100,000 population. Alabama follows closely behind at 50.8 deaths per 100,000. Louisiana, Georgia, and Arkansas also have notably high mortality rates, with 45.8, 45.9, and 45.6 deaths per 100,000, respectively. These figures suggest that southern states have a higher prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease-related deaths.

Lowest mortality rates

On the other end of the spectrum, New York has the lowest Alzheimer’s disease mortality rate, with only 14 deaths per 100,000 population. Maryland and Massachusetts also have low mortality rates, with 15.8 and 18.6 deaths per 100,000, respectively. The data indicate that northeastern states generally have lower Alzheimer’s disease-related death rates.

Other notable trends

California, Texas, and Florida – three of the most populous states in the US – have relatively moderate Alzheimer’s disease mortality rates, with 40.6, 44.6, and 19.8 deaths per 100,000 population, respectively. However, these states also have the highest total number of Alzheimer’s disease-related deaths, highlighting the significant burden of the disease on these states’ health systems.

Takeaway

The disparities in Alzheimer’s disease mortality rates across US states are evident from the data. Although it is challenging to pinpoint specific factors contributing to these differences, it is crucial for public health officials, policymakers, and researchers to address these disparities and implement targeted interventions to reduce Alzheimer’s disease mortality rates across the country.


Tim Williamson, a psychology graduate from the University of Hertfordshire, has a keen interest in the fields of mental health, wellness, and lifestyle.

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