4 MIN READ | Wellness

Tommy Williamson

2021 Is Your Year to Stop Smoking: Here’s How

Cite This
Tommy Williamson, (2020, November 24). 2021 Is Your Year to Stop Smoking: Here’s How. Psychreg on Wellness. https://www.psychreg.org/2021-stop-smoking/
Reading Time: 4 minutes

The life of a smoker is a vicious cycle and one that is filled with hopes and self-proclaimed promises. Did you know that a third of smokers, on a global scale, have at some point contemplated quitting but never succeeded? There are over a thousand reasons why you should quit smoking. One has to do with your overall health and two, you don’t want to expose those around you to the secondhand effects of smoking. 

There are no known ways which one can rely on to stop smoking. This is because we are made different and everyone has a different personality, preferences, and a unique mindset. This can make it hard to find a formula that’s best suited for an individual to help them get off the smoking routine. 

As you might be aware, smoking, and over time, will develop into a habit and eventually into an addiction. This means that a person will be hooked into the nicotine addiction for, well, life if they are not careful. So, will 2020 be your year to quit smoking? Below are ways on how to lay off the cigarette sticks. 

Find alternatives

Your decision to quit smoking should be prompted by your willingness to improve your health status. Your life expectancy is highly dependent upon this one decision in your life. The fact that there are health issues that might crop up as a result of your smoking habits should be a red flag that will lead you into making an informed decision. 

Today, there exist a plethora of alternatives to smoking tobacco, some of which are safer and ones that will help to get you on the path to a tobacco-free lifestyle. To help bring things into perspective, quitting tobacco is tough and there are no easier ways of explaining this. If you are looking for ways to quit smoking, then look no further. You might consider hemp cigarettes as they are in no way addictive and it’s mother nature’s solution to quitting nicotine. These cigarettes contain 0% nicotine, they are not addictive, and have no altering effects as they are low on THC. 

Nevertheless, you’ll want to find a trustworthy distributor who’s all about supplying their clients with quality products. You just don’t want to jump from a frying pan to the fire by quitting cigarettes and getting hooked to marijuana. Find alternatives that you can easily quit at any time of the day. 

Get Rid Of Any Smoking Triggers 

Being hooked on nicotine is more than just an addiction. Some aspects may trigger your involuntary actions and urges. Most people will smoke due to stressful situations, as a way to reward themselves, or due to peer pressure. These triggers might have to do with constant exposure to cigarettes and by this, exposure to environments that encourage smoking. 

You might have to go for a week or month without watching TV commercials that advertise cigarettes. Also, steer clear from friends who smoke, or change your favourite relaxation joint for a non-smoking one. These are steps that might seem demanding, uncalled for, and tough. But eventually, they might be your only option for quitting smoking. 

It starts with a resolute mind

Setting your goals, setting a quit date, and making the efforts towards the same are ways that will be initiated by a resolved mind. You need to look at the bigger picture and one that involves you leading a healthier lifestyle

Involve others

You have no reason to go it alone especially if you have a weakness in giving in to the pressures of life. Quitting smoking is easier said than done. Having a support network from your most trusted and non-smoking friends and family members is a sure-fire way to help you get off the cigarette sticks. 

Having such friends by your side will be a distraction because they’ll help to keep you busy, listen whenever you have issues to get off your chest, and they’ll also provide you with the support you need. But then again, you need to make it clear from the word go that your goals are to quit smoking. 

Do you have any coping strategies?

Quitting smoking is challenging and it’s a decision that might need to be approached on a one-day at a time basis. Ever heard of withdrawal symptoms? You need a fall back plan to help you completely get off the hook from the jaws of nicotine. You might consider a nicotine replacement therapy to help prevent any chances of nicotine withdrawal. 

An addiction to nicotine will also be a behavioural problem and at this point that a professional therapist or counsellor might come in handy. Before making any drastic changes, you might want to consider consulting a physician as they’ll advise you on the best steps to take as well as provide you with incentives on how to go about it. Let’s take a look at various ways to help you cope better after quitting smoking:

  • Invest in nicotine patches
  • Keep your mouth busy by chewing nicotine gums and nicotine lozenges
  • Invest in fast-acting nicotine nasal sprays

A change of diet might help

It’s about time you changed your diet if you are thinking about quitting smoking. Some foods can make it even harder for one to quit smoking. These are especially foods that made smoking a satisfying activity. Any foods you took and felt the urge to smoke such as meat, pastries, or fries can be laid off for the time being. Instead, you might consider a green diet and more fruits. It will be tough but it’s all worth your efforts. 

As earlier mentioned, quitting smoking should be done on a one-day-at-a-time basis. Don’t be in a rush to kick off this habit from your life. There are also people around you who’ll be willing to help and not to mention, counsellors and other institutions where you can seek refuge until the habit is no longer a bother to your precious life. 


Tommy Williamson did his degree in psychology at the University of Edinburgh. He has an ongoing interest in mental health and well-being.


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